Graphic Flash: Collaboration between Students in Creative Writing, Illustration, Graphic Design, and Multimedia Design

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Principal Investigator: Kelly Roe, Oswego Students across multiple departments will work collectively and collaboratively to create, and sustain a start-up e-magazine. The project centers on creative partnerships formed across departments for the purpose of simulating professional collaborations in the production creative work. This project will team writers, illustrators and graphic/media designers to produce an e-publication for distribution on Apple and Android based sites. The desired outcome is to establish an e-magazine that could be produced bi-annually. The project will initially feature work by SUNY Oswego students and hopes to expand to include partnerships with K-12 Schools from the surrounding area. Its purpose would be to provide an outlet for original creative work while also providing analysis of that work as well as technical explanation in order to allow others to build on the work. The ultimate goal is to empower students through participation in a creative enterprise with entrepreneurial possibilities that fosters expression and experimentation. Co-PI’s and Key Partners: Leigh Wilson, Creative Writing Professor, English Department, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Oswego Amy Bartell, Illustration Professor, Art Department, School of Communication Media and the Arts, Oswego Cara Thompson, Graphic Design/Multimedia Professor, Art Department, School of Communication Media and the Arts, Oswego Reports and Resources: Mid-project report

Building Innovative Open Korean and Japanese Courses: A Pilot on Technology-enhanced Curriculum Development

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Principal Investigator: Sarah Jourdain, Stony Brook University SBU proposes building innovative OPEN blended/online Korean and Japanese foreign language courses to meet the growing needs and demands of our current precollegiate and collegiate students. The online and blended modalities of content delivery for these courses will be the first of their kind at SBU. We will share the innovative technologies and best practices used to build and implement these courses with the OPEN SUNY Network. We will then publish research findings comparing face-to-face to online/blended learning outcomes in these courses, as well as the impact of the learning environment and student factors on transactional distance, social presence, teacher presence, and cognitive presence. SBU has gathered staff and faculty across interdisciplinary departments and commitments from various Centers and Organizations within and external to the campus to make this project feasible. With these courses, we hope to share our pioneering innovations in the field of online and blended learning. Co-PI’s and Key Partners: Eriko Sato, Assistant Professor, Japanese Linguistics and Pedagogy, Asian and Asian American Studies, Stony Brook University Heejeong Sohn, Lecturer, Asian and Asian American Studies, Stony Brook University Julian Chen, Technical Director, Language Learning Research Center (LLRC), Stony Brook University Kayode C.V. Ekwunife-Orakwue, Doctoral Candidate, Graduate Teaching Assistant, Department of Technology and Society, Stony Brook University Reports and Resources: Mid-project report

Online Global Learning Communities in the Humanities: A Course Model

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Awarded Grant: $3,200 Principal Investigator: Celia Easton, SUNY Geneseo A newly conceived course, “Jane Austen from New York to Bath,” provides a model for constructing online courses in the Humanities that allow students to share learning communities without walls, to communicate internationally on their course topic, and to ladder study-abroad experiences to provide international experiences to multiple students, regardless of time and financial resources. This course model demonstrates how to convert a conventional, classroom-based course into an online learning community, with the added component of content provided by students living and studying in different parts of the world. By utilizing course management software, wikis, blogs, embedded video, and file sharing, this course model demonstrates how the essence of discussion-based humanities courses can be sustained in a global, virtual classroom. Reports and Resources: Project final report Mid-project report Project outcomes form Project outcomes report 2.0 Creative Commons License:

DCrit: Digital Critiquing Platform

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The “Digital Critique Platform” (DCrit) innovates traditional critique processes and facilitates program-level review and assessment. DCrit accepts submitted projects for critique; assigns participating faculty, professionals and peers to conduct rubric-based critiques of specific student projects; and distributes critiques to participating students. The platform will support a program-wide portfolio of student projects to serve assessment purposes. DCrit supports synchronous and asynchronous, and online and in-person critiques, expanding critique possibilities beyond the traditional synchronous, face-to-face model. DCrit will capture and archive both student work and critical assessments in a single database, facilitating the review and assessment of both individual-level and aggregate-level progress towards specific educational objectives.