Information resources for evidence-based interprofessional health care decisions: Developing, testing and evaluating library-based innovative technology enhanced team instruction methods

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Principal Investigator: Amy Lyons, University at Buffalo Multidisciplinary interprofessional teams of librarians, faculty and students at the University at Buffalo (UB) and SUNY Buffalo State (Buffalo State) will plan, pilot and evaluate innovative approaches to instruction using Open SUNY online learning tools and technology enhanced classrooms at Buffalo State. Interprofessional team instruction will center on student competencies in the discovery, evaluation and sharing of evidence-based information resources for collaborative, interprofessional decision-making in healthcare. The project will support UB’s Interporfessional Education (IPE) Initiative involving UB’s five health sciences schools, related disciplines, and resident education programs in affiliated teaching hospitals. It will also support Buffalo State’s undergraduate health education programs. The project will culminate with a two-day workshop to test and evaluate the effectiveness of the most promising instruction methods in the Buffalo State Butler Library active learning classrooms. The impact of these instruction methods and technologies on student learning outcomes and attitudinal changes will be studied using reliable and valid formative and summative evaluation methods. Project outcomes, model syllabi, evaluations and instruction videos will be disseminated in journal publications, on local/national library and IPE websites, at regional and national conferences, and via the SUNY Learning Commons. Co-PI’s and Key Partners: Maryruth Glogowski, Associate Vice President, Library & Instructional Technology, E.H. Butler Library, Buffalo State Gary D. Byrd, Director, Health Sciences Library, University at Buffalo Paul T. Wietig, Assistant Vice President, Interprofessional Education, Academic Health Center, University at Buffalo Nell Aronoff, Senior Assistant Librarian, Medical Education Services Librarian and Liaison to the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Sharon Murphy, Associate Librarian, Reference and Education Services Librarian and Liaison to the School of Nursing, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Elizabeth M. Stellrecht, Senior Assistant Librarian, Clinical Librarian and Liaison to the School of Dental Medicine, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Deborah McConnell Chiarella, Senior Assistant Librarian, Coordinator Education Services and Liaison to the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Michelle Zafron, Associate Librarian, Coordinator Reference & Education Services and Liaison to the School of Public Health and Health Professions, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Howard B. Pikoff, Associate Librarian, Specialist for Psychology, Social Work and Judaic Studies, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Michael Lavin, Librarian, Business/Management Librarian, University Libraries, University at Buffalo Amy Lyons, Associate Librarian, Associate Director, Health Sciences Library and Liaison to the Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo Andrew Symons, Clinical Assistant Professor and Vice Chair for Medical Student Education,  Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo Nancy Campbell-Heider, Associate Professor, Chair Family, Community & Health Systems Sciences, School of Nursing, University at Buffalo Donald Antonson, Professor, Associate Chair, Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo Kathleen M. K. Boje, Associate Professor, Vice Chair and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo Patricia J. Ohtake, Associate Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Science, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo Diane E. Elze, Associate Professor, Director of MSW Program, School of Social Work, University at Buffalo Paul E. Tesluk, Donald S. Carmichael Professor of Organization Behavior, Chair Department of Organization and Human Resources, School of Management, University at Buffalo Rosemary B. Lubinski, Professor, Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, University at Buffalo Jeremiah S. Grabowski, Online Program Coordinator, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo Caryn Sobieski-VanDelinder, Webmaster/Graphic Designer, School of Public Health and health Professions, University at Buffalo Katie Bertel, Academic Outreach and Engagement Librarian, E.H. Butler Library, Buffalo State Leah Galka, Academic Outreach and Engagement Librarian, E.H. Butler Library, Buffalo State Carol A. DeNysschen, Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Buffalo State Constance Dean Qualls, Professor, Chair Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Buffalo State Reports and Resources: Mid-project report

Implementation of Team-Based Learning in an Asynchronous Distance Education Graduate Nursing Course

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Awarded Grant: $20,000 Principal Investigator: Paula Timoney, Stony Brook University It is suggested that the implementation of team-based learning (TBL) in the curriculum of an asynchronous distance education graduate nursing course will improve student engagement and promote quality learning experiences. Health care professionals must work as a team to improve care delivery and promote patient safety. Michaelsen (2008) suggests that TBL will help to prepare students to be more effective health care providers. Team-based learning is an instructional strategy which consists of small group activities designed to provide students with both conceptual and procedural knowledge. The four essential principles are student accountability, self-managed groups, meaningful assignments, and frequent and timely feedback. The Stony Brook neonatal nurse practitioner program has a long and successful history with distance education. The content is delivered asynchronously through recorded lectures, reading assignments, worksheets and clinical applications. To elevate the quality of the program, Neonatal Pharmacology, a required course in the program, will be revised to incorporate principles of TBL: learning activities consisting of individual and group assignments, discussion boards, peer evaluations, and objective exams. The students will be randomized to groups of five to seven members. Validated tools will be adapted to measure student engagement and student and faculty satisfaction. Examination scores will be compared with the scores of students in the course as it is currently delivered. Results will be disseminated through publications and presentations at conferences. Successful implementation of TBL in this course will lead to expansion of TBL in other distance education courses. This project supports the objectives of the Open SUNY initiative designed to ensure student success and promote faculty development in providing innovative strategies to maximize student learning. Co-PI’s and Key Partners: Terri Cavaliere, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Stony Brook University Reports and Resources: Mid-project report Project outcomes report Project Abstract

Impact of a Cloud-Based Program on SLOs in an Online Health Assessment Course

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Awarded Grant: $19,400 Principal Investigator: Susan Deane, SUNY Delhi As clinical practicum experiences become more and more difficult for nursing students to acquire, alternatives need to be explored. SUNY Delhi will assess student outcomes utilizing the interactive digital clinical experience (DCE), ShadowHealth, for an online Health Assessment course in the RN-BSN program. Using ShadowHealth, students will interact with a virtual patient, Tina Jones™, in a virtual hospital setting conducting health history and system-based assessments. Student learning outcomes will be evaluated through the use of grading rubrics, module summaries, and written transcripts of student activities within the program. The relationship between student demographic characteristics, class retention, assessment of student learning outcomes, and student satisfaction among student using ShadowHealth will be identified. This use of technology is expected to have significant impact on nursing students to achieve successful course and program outcomes. Co-PI’s and Key Partners: Dr. Kirsty Digger, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, SUNY Delhi Dr. Mary Pat Lewis, Associate Dean, School of Nursing, SUNY Delhi Elizabeth Pratt, MSN, RNC, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, SUNY Delhi Reports and Resources: Final project report Mid-project report Project outcomes report Creative Commons License: